Business

SriLankan Airlines launches pre-order meals for Economy Class

SriLankan Airlines has introduced a Pre-Order Meal service for Economy Class passengers flying out of Colombo, which can be ordered up to 48 hours prior to departure for US$ 10 upwards.

The national carrier announced that the service is available on flights departing Colombo to London, Bangkok, Canton, Jakarta, Hong Kong, Kuala Lumpur, Melbourne, Tokyo, Beijing, Shanghai, Singapore, Abu Dhabi, Bahrain, Dammam, Doha, Dubai, Jeddah, Kuwait, Muscat, Riyadh and Seychelles, while India and the Maldives have not been included yet.

The meals range from breakfast items such as Western Breakfast, Arabic Breakfast, Indian Breakfast and Healthy Breakfast; or snacks and main items such as Oriental Style Meal, Salmon Steak, Chicken Lamprais, Fillet Steak, Hot Dog, Fish Fritter, Beef Burger and Seafood Pie.

All dishes on the menu can be seen at www.srilankan.com/en_uk/flying-with-us/premium-meals, with pictures to help passengers make their choice. A limited number of pre-ordered meals/snacks are provided on each flight. Meals, once reserved, are non–refundable and meal types cannot be changed. When a meal is pre-ordered from these menus, the passenger’s standard meal will be automatically cancelled. This facility is not available on codeshare/interline flights operated by partner airlines.

The meals can be pre-ordered through the SriLankan Airlines 24-hour Global Contact Centre on 1979 from any phone service in Sri Lanka. Overseas callers should dial +94 777 77 1979. Meals can also be pre-ordered at SriLankan Airlines ticket offices and travel agents using the Amadeus system.

SriLankan operates a route network of 114 cities in 48 countries from its hub in Colombo, and also connects its passengers to over 1,000 cities in 160 countries around the globe through its oneworld partner airlines.

Recently it was announced that SriLankan will relaunch the search for an equity partner in September, after attempts to privatise the carrier last year failed when San Francisco-based private equity firm TPG withdrew its bid for a 49% stake.